spitzbergen-3
fb  Spitsbergen Panoramas - 360-degree panoramas  de  en  nb  Spitsbergen Shop  
Home → Search for: reindeer

Search Results for: reindeer

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6

Sval­bard rein­de­er (bull). Blom­strand­hal­vøya, mid Sep­tem­ber. Descrip­ti­on: The Sval­bard rein­de­er (or Spits­ber­gen rein­de­er) is the only rein­de­er spe­ci­es in Sval­bard. It is a uni­que, rela­tively small sub­s­pe­ci­es. Both sexes have ant­lers, but tho­se of the males are big­ger. Male rein­de­er grow their ant­lers from April to July, shed the bast in August and Sep­tem­ber and final­ly the ant­lers in late autumn, after… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

The Spits­ber­gen-rein­de­er, also known as Sval­bard-rein­de­er, has seen a lot of ups and downs sin­ce it came to Spits­ber­gen from the Rus­si­an Arc­tic thousands of years ago. It beca­me a sub-spe­ci­es on its own which is not found any­whe­re out­side Sval­bard. Nevertheless, it was hun­ted almost to extinc­tion until it was final­ly pro­tec­ted by the Nor­we­gi­an government in 1925 – soon after the Spits­ber­gen Trea­ty had given Nor­way… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

The Nor­we­gi­an Polar Insti­tu­te coun­ted 1374 Sval­bard rein­de­er in the Advent­da­len around Lon­gye­ar­by­en this year. Many cal­ves were obser­ved and only a few dead rein­de­er found. This is a trend that has been obser­ved for years: The rein­de­er popu­la­ti­on has been gro­wing slight­ly in this regi­on for years. Well-fed Sval­bard rein­de­er, an ende­mic sub­s­pe­ci­es of the rein­de­er The rein­de­er have been coun… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

Christ­mas is a time of love, fami­ly and healt­hy food. Pres­ents, trees and… mys­te­ry. Or do you know how San­ta Claus mana­ges to visit far more than a bil­li­on child­ren around the glo­be? Even if you take tho­se out who have been naugh­ty or who may­be don’t want (or are not allo­wed to) have anything to do with Christ­mas – the­re is still a lot of work to do for the old man. Sharon Geor­ge of the Kee­le Uni­ver­si­ty in Eng­land has done… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

News from the world of the rein­de­er, who are cur­r­ent­ly facing hard times in the Arc­tic with the pre­vai­ling polar night. The toughest times will, howe­ver, come in spring, when the light returns. By then, fat reser­ves are most­ly used up, but snow and ice still make access to food dif­fi­cult for qui­te some time. To sur­vi­ve under such extre­me con­di­ti­ons, rein­de­er have deve­lo­ped a num­ber of asto­nis­hing adap­t­ati­ons. The­se… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

If San­ta Claus does not bring gifts on Satur­day, that could also be due to his rein­de­er. Whe­ther they can pull the sledge hea­vi­ly packed with gifts is ques­tion­ab­le. Becau­se the rein­de­er on Spitz­ber­gen are get­ting thin­ner! The sub­s­pe­ci­es – the Sval­bard rein­de­er – is alrea­dy some­what smal­ler than their rela­ti­ves on the main­land. 135 ani­mals were weig­hed by the rese­ar­cher Ste­ve “Mis­ter Rein­de­er” Albon from the J… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

Time is fly­ing, the­re is always some­thing to do. Most­ly stuff that isn’t worth men­tio­ning, but it is real­ly fil­ling the days. Ever­y­day life. Pro­jects. Work. Yes, and life. Friends. Being out­side. Being out­side is obvious­ly one main rea­son for living in Lon­gye­ar­by­en. It will soon be full moon and the sky is most­ly clear. The light is pure magic. The Nor­we­gi­ans have a beau­ti­ful word for that: “trol­sk”. May­be you can use “… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

The Nor­we­gi­an Polar Insti­tu­te finis­hed its annu­al sur­vey of the local rein­de­er popu­la­ti­on in Advent­da­len and the results tur­ned out to be qui­te sur­pri­sing for the sci­en­tists: Again the num­ber of ani­mals incre­a­sed to a new all-time high. In June sci­en­tists of the Nor­we­gi­an Polar Insti­tu­te count the rein­de­ers in Advent­da­len and the sur­roun­ding side val­leys. This year they coun­ted clo­se to 1500 indi­vi­du­als… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

The num­ber of rein­de­ers in Advent­da­len reached the hig­hest level this year sin­ce the sur­vey began in 1979. Reseachers of the Nor­we­gi­an Polar Insti­tu­te coun­ted about 1200 ani­mals inclu­ding 300 cal­ves. Ther­eby the num­ber of rein­de­ers incre­a­sed about 250 exem­plars in com­pa­ri­son to last year. On the one hand this could be exp­lai­ned due to war­mer som­mers that allow rein­de­ers to accu­mu­la­te a thick lay­er of fat, whic… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

It was qui­te obvious in the field due to many dead rein­de­er, but now it is “offi­cial”, becau­se foun­ded on sci­en­ti­fic data: 2008 was not a good year of the Spits­ber­gen rein­de­er. During free­zing fol­lowing on a warm spell ear­ly in 2008, the tun­dra was cove­r­ed with a lay­er of ice, which made access to food dif­fi­cult. In April 2008, the ani­mals were on average 21 % less in weight than nor­mal, and only 10 % of the adult fema­les… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

Local rein­de­er popu­la­ti­ons in several important val­leys near Lon­gye­ar­by­en such as Sem­mel­da­len, Cole­s­da­len and Advent­da­len have dou­bled sin­ce 1994, and this trend is belie­ved to app­ly also to other parts of the Spits­ber­gen archi­pe­la­go. The rea­son is thought to be a 2 degrees incre­a­se of sum­mer tem­pe­ra­tures which have led to stron­ger growth of vege­ta­ti­on. On the other hand, ins­ta­ble wea­ther pat­terns have le… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

Recen­ty, a sur­pri­sing obser­va­ti­on has been made in Wij­defjord (cen­tral Spits­ber­gen), when a polar bear kil­led a rein­de­er – so far, it has lar­ge­ly been assu­med that polar bears eat dead or inju­red rein­de­er, but don’t hunt ani­mals that are in good shape. This rai­ses the ques­ti­on if the obser­ved beha­viour is real­ly as rare as assu­med (alt­hough this was not the very first obser­va­ti­on of its kind) or if it is more com­mo… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

Traf­fic in Lon­gye­ar­by­en is usual­ly qui­te safe, but Mon­day evening saw a tra­gic acci­dent when a car hit a rein­de­er on way 500. The animal’s back was bro­ken, and the poli­ce did accord­in­gly not have a choice but to kill the rein­de­er on the spot. The­re are almost always some rein­de­er some­whe­re in Lon­gye­ar­by­en, and they are usual­ly not afraid of peop­le or moving vehi­cles and they don’t watch out for cars befo­re cros­sing… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

Alk­hor­net

Nature from fjord to fjell: the arctic ecosystem in a nutshell

The moun­tain cor­ner Alk­hor­net is towe­ring 617 metres high on the nort­hern side of the ent­ran­ce to Isfjord, mar­king the smal­ler side bay of Trygg­ham­na. Thousands of kit­ti­wa­kes and Brünnich’s guil­lemots are bree­ding on the steep cliffs high up on the moun­tain.  Copy URL  pano anchor link: #Alkhornet_16Juli13_060 The bree­ding sea­b­irds are fer­ti­li­zing the tun­dra, which is accord­in­gly rich and green. Rein­de­er and arc­tic f… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

The next image from the Spits­ber­gen calen­dar 2018 is the mon­th Novem­ber. It shows a small group of Spits­ber­gen rein­de­er. The­se shed their ant­lers once every year. The exact time is dif­fe­rent for males and fema­les. It also varies indi­vi­du­al­ly, to some degree. This small herd of rein­de­er shows all varia­ti­ons in their ant­lers: one does not have ant­lers at all, one dones only have one half and the third one has got the full se… Con­ti­nue rea­ding

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6

Search Result List from Friday, 22. October 2021 um 21:53:59 Uhr (GMT+1)
Copyright (Texts and Photos) mainly by Rolf Stange
css.php