spitzbergen-3
fb  Spitsbergen Panoramas - 360-degree panoramas  de  en  nb  Spitsbergen Shop  
Marker
Home → January, 2021

Monthly Archives: January 2021 − News & Stories


Nor­way tigh­tens tra­vel rest­ric­tions and requi­res tests for tra­vel­lers to Spits­ber­gen

Many count­ries have intro­du­ced rest­ric­tions on tra­vel­ling in an attempt to keep the new ver­si­ons of the Sars­Cov-2 (coro­na) virus under con­trol. Nor­way has also had a num­ber cases with the­se new viru­s­es recen­ty and tigh­tens in on regu­la­ti­ons for inter­na­tio­nal traf­fic to redu­ce fur­ther spre­a­ding, accor­ding to a press release by the Nor­we­gi­an govern­ment, which is also available in Eng­lish (click here).

Corona-quarantine, Spitsbergen

Appli­es to all of Spits­ber­gen: Coro­na-qua­ran­ti­ne.
Com­pul­so­ry coro­na test­ing has now addi­tio­nal­ly been intro­du­ced (pho­to com­po­si­ti­on).

Sin­ce today (Fri­day, 01 Janu­ary) ever­y­bo­dy who tra­vels to Spits­ber­gen has to be tes­ted within 24 hours befo­re tra­vel­ling. This has to be done befo­re tra­vel­ling, hence on the main­land and not after arri­val.

Rapid tests are also accept­ed, acor­ding to Knut Sel­mer, medi­cal doc­tor at the hos­pi­tal in Lon­gye­ar­by­en, who tal­ked to Sval­bard­pos­ten.

New regu­la­ti­ons for dro­nes

New regu­la­ti­ons for dro­nes are in force sin­ce 01 Janu­ary 2021. Dro­nes weig­hing more than 250 g or that have a came­ra need to be regis­tered at the Nor­we­gi­an air traf­fic aut­ho­ri­ty air traf­fic aut­ho­ri­ty (Luftf­art­stil­syn­set). This includes a web-based cour­se, a test and a fee. Ever­y­bo­dy who wants to use a dro­ne in Sval­bard (or main­land Nor­way, for that sake) will need to go through that, unless the dro­ne weighs less than 250 g and does not have a came­ra.

Drones in Spitsbergen: rules and no flight zone Longyearbyen

No flight zone around Lon­gye­ar­by­en and the most important rules for dro­nes in Sval­bard (Sys­sel­man­nen. Fol­low the link to get a high reso­lu­ti­on file).

The most important rules are given on the Sysselmannen’s web­site. The­se include among­st others:

  • Regis­tra­ti­on, cour­se and test, see abo­ve.
  • Gene­ral no flight zones within 5 km distance from the air­ports in Lon­gye­ar­by­en and Sveagru­va. This includes almost all of Lon­gye­ar­by­en!
  • Gene­ral no flight zones within 20 km distance around Ny-Åle­sund (radio silence zone to avo­id dis­tur­ban­ce of sen­si­ti­ve sci­en­ti­fic instru­ments). This includes the who­le Kongsfjord.
  • Dis­tur­ban­ce of wild­life and humans is gene­ral­ly for­bidden. Respect peo­p­les’ pri­va­cy (mini­mum distance from peo­p­le, buil­dings, boats etc.: 150 m).
  • Maxi­mum flight alti­tu­de abo­ve ground: 120 m.
  • The dro­ne must remain within eye­sight.
  • Fly­ing in dark­ness is not allo­wed.
General no flight zones within 5 km distance

New rules for dro­nes are in force from 01 Janu­ary 2021.

Expan­si­on of Nor­dens­ki­öld Land natio­nal park

Nor­dens­ki­öld Land Natio­nal­park includes the sou­thern part of Nor­dens­ki­öld Land, in other words the north coast of Bell­sund. This natio­nal park is now under review and the plan is to make it much lar­ger. The idea is to include almost all of Van Mijenfjord and lar­ge parts of Van Keu­len­fjord. The south side of Van Keu­len­fjord are alre­a­dy part of the South Spits­ber­gen natio­nal park. The result would hence be that all of Spits­ber­gen south of Nor­dens­ki­öld Land, from Van Mijenfjord to Sør­kapp, would have pro­tec­tion sta­tus as natio­nal park.

Nordenskiöld Land National park: expansion

Blue: the sche­du­led expan­si­on of Nor­dens­ki­öld Land natio­nal park.
Map © Sys­sel­man­nen på Sval­bard.

Public hea­ring

The pro­cess is curr­ent­ly in the stage of public hea­ring. The public is encou­ra­ged to give input to the Sys­sel­man­nen.

Rest­ric­tions for snow mobi­les, new bird sanc­tua­ries

A lar­ger Nor­dens­ki­öld Land natio­nal park is likely to invol­ve seve­ral rest­ric­tions for public traf­fic, inclu­ding rest­ric­tions for moto­ri­zed traf­fic (snow mobi­les) on the fjord ice of Van Mijenfjor­den. This is main­ly tar­ge­tet against snow mobi­le traf­fic to Rin­ders­buk­ta and Akseløya. In addi­ti­on, 3 new bird sanc­tua­ries are plan­ned in loca­ti­ons that have high con­cen­tra­ti­ons of res­t­ing and bree­ding birds, main­ly com­mon eider ducks, bar­na­cle geese and pink-foo­ted geese. The loca­ti­ons curr­ent­ly in ques­ti­on are Maria­hol­men (near Akseløya), Ehol­men (near Fors­bla­dod­den) and Mid­ter­huks­let­ta.

Nordenskiöld Land national park:  bird sanctuary Midterhukssletta

The expan­si­on of the Nor­dens­ki­öld Land natio­nal park may bring traf­fic rest­ric­tions in seve­ral new bird sanc­tua­ries, incu­ding Mid­ter­huks­let­ta.

Parts of the for­mer sett­le­ment of Sveagru­va, which is lar­ge­ly being remo­ved the­se days, are curr­ent­ly not included in the enlar­ged natio­nal park.

The cour­se of things up north

No new here for a week or more, is the­re not­hing going on in Spits­ber­gen? Inde­ed, the far north has not shaken the world recent­ly. But the­re is always some­thing going. Not just coro­na – it is a long page, stay tun­ed! 😉

Coro­na, Coro­na, Coro­na

Coro­na is obvious­ly com­man­ding the world the­se days, and that is also the case in Spits­ber­gen. Even though the­re has not yet been any cofirm­ed infec­tion with SARS-Cov-2. Last sum­mer, the virus was alre­a­dy the­re with a Hur­tig­ru­ten ship, but it didn’t stay as the­re was no cont­act bet­ween the ship and the sett­le­ment, the trip star­ted and finis­hed in main­land Nor­way.

Corona, Spitsbergen

The coro­na virus still has the world in its firm grip, inclu­ding Spits­ber­gen.

The­re is still some tou­rism in Lon­gye­ar­by­en: a few tou­rists come from the Nor­we­gi­an main­land. The­re are, of cour­se, strict rules. And locals return after their Christ­mas holi­days or wha­te­ver they have done, poten­ti­al­ly giving the virus a lift. In one case, it tur­ned out that someone who had retur­ned to Lon­gye­ar­by­en had been a cont­act of someone with a con­firm­ed infec­tion. So far, redu­ced cont­acts and other safe­ty mea­su­res seem to have work­ed fine. On the other hand, a few of Longyearbyen’s oldest inha­bi­tants alre­a­dy got the first dose of the SARS-Cov-2 vac­ci­ne.

Regu­la­ti­ons for inter­na­tio­nal tra­vel­lers are still very strict, obvious­ly, and inter­na­tio­nal tou­rism up north is prac­ti­cal­ly non-exis­ting the­se days.

Coro­na: hard on the eco­no­my

Con­se­quen­ces for local com­pa­nies are dra­ma­tic, espe­ci­al­ly within tou­rism. And bridging aid are more dif­fi­cult than on the main­land, part­ly becau­se of Spitsbergen’s spe­cial sta­tus. But important steps have been taken in recent weeks. Still, many can just hope for impro­ve­ment befo­re their jobs or small com­pa­nies get lost. The important win­ter sea­son, usual­ly pea­king from Febru­ary to ear­ly May, will hard­ly hap­pen as it nor­mal­ly does.

Corona, Spitzbergen: Tourismus

Win­ter tou­rists in Spits­ber­gen: nobo­dy knows when this will be pos­si­ble again, but many are wai­ting despera­te­ly.

Powe­ring Lon­gye­ar­by­en up

The future of Longyearbyen’s elec­tri­ci­ty sup­p­ly has been deba­ted for a long times. The sta­te of the dis­cus­sion is still pret­ty much like the sum­ma­ry given in Decem­ber. In very short words: a new solu­ti­on is nee­ded, and it is likely to be based on some­thing dif­fe­rent than coal, at least part­ly. But now Oslo offi­ci­als have said that this will have con­se­quen­ces for mine 7, Longyearbyen’s last coal mine. It is obvious that the years of coal mining will come to an end in the not too far future. So far, some­thing near 2030 see­med likely. Now it may actual­ly be ear­lier than that. But final decis­i­ons have yet to be made.

Mine 7 near Longyearbyen

Mine 7 near Lon­gye­ar­by­en still has some years left, but the end of coal mining is coming clo­ser.

Cash trou­bles

The end of Svalbard’s one and only bank in Lon­gye­ar­by­en was reason for some exci­te­ment in 2020. The bank clo­sed for good in Decem­ber. The ATM had alre­a­dy been out of ope­ra­ti­on for quite a while, becau­se it tur­ned out to be incre­asing­ly dif­fi­cult to get cash from the main­land to Lon­gye­ar­by­en. Curr­ent­ly, the­re is no sup­p­ly of fresh cash in Lon­gye­ar­by­en. Dif­fi­cul­ties ari­sing becau­se of that seem to be limi­t­ed, as cashl­ess pay­ment methods are very com­mon in Nor­way and the­re is no inter­na­tio­nal traf­fic the­se days. But at the latest when tou­rists start to return from count­ries out­side Scan­di­na­via, pro­blems will increase if the­re is no cash local­ly available. The super­mar­ket, Coop Sval­bard (bet­ter known as Sval­bard­bu­tik­ken), may be able to pro­vi­de a solu­ti­on.

On my own behalf: Book and pos­ter “Sval­bardhyt­ter”

I have got seve­ral pro­jects in pro­gress. Some of them are lar­ger ones and the­se will requi­re time to get any­whe­re near publi­ca­ti­on, but ano­ther one is soon to be finis­hed: Ori­gi­nal­ly con­side­red to be “only” a pos­ter, “Sval­bardhyt­ter” (Sval­bard huts) is now a com­bi­na­ti­on of a pos­ter and a book, intro­du­cing 60 his­to­ri­cal huts. Huts are inte­res­t­ing and often beau­tiful places in the Arc­tic. In the past, they offe­red at least a mini­mum of safe­ty and com­fort, and today, they give a sen­se of adven­ture and histo­ry. And, of cour­se, any visit to a hut in Spits­ber­gen, whe­re­ver it is, is always an excur­si­on in a beau­tiful area!

Svalbardhytter: Hammerfesthuset

Ham­mer­fest house on Bear Island (Bjørnøya) was built in 1822. This makes it Svalbard’s oldest buil­ding that is still stan­ding. It is one of 60 huts intro­du­ced in the post and book pro­ject “Sval­bardhyt­ter”.

The Nor­we­gi­an title seems to indi­ca­te a cryp­tic text, but this is not the case: the pos­ter is a col­la­ge of 60 pho­tos and place names, and the litt­le book has some infor­ma­ti­on about every one of them in 3 lan­guages: Ger­man, Eng­lish and Nor­we­gi­an. And it does also have the pho­tos.

“Sval­bardhyt­ter” will soon be available in the Spitzbergen.de online shop with is clo­se­ly asso­cia­ted with this web­site. If you want to make sure that you don’t miss it, just sign up to my email news­let­ter by sen­ding a mes­sa­ge to rolf.stange@spitzbergen.de.

On my own behalf: online pre­sen­ta­ti­on series “Arc­tic Wed­nes­day”

Our series of online pre­sen­ta­ti­ons “the Arc­tic Wed­nes­day” has star­ted last Wed­nes­day with my pre­sen­ta­ti­on about Bear Island and Jan May­en. I am hap­py to say that it was very suc­cessful – I may not quite be neu­tral, but I got a lot of very posi­ti­ve feed­back so I can be cer­tain that this is the truth 🙂 Bir­git Lutz and I will con­ti­nue the series over ano­ther cou­ple of weeks until mid Febru­ary. Click here for more infor­ma­ti­on. The talks will be in Ger­man.

The Arc­tic Wed­nes­day: polar online pre­sen­ta­ti­ons start­ing next week

Next week, Bir­git Lutz and I (Rolf Stan­ge) will start the “Arc­tic Wed­nes­day”! A series of online pre­sen­ta­ti­ons whe­re we can pick up sel­ec­ted topics. Let’s tra­vel tog­e­ther online to the beau­tiful, cold ends of the world! We will start on 13 Janu­ary with a tour to Bear Island and Jan May­en, fol­lo­wed later by a series of ano­ther five dates, every Wed­nes­day for six weeks in total. Bir­git and I have sel­ec­ted a ran­ge of topics ran­ging from adven­ture and tra­vel through histo­ry to envi­ron­ment, which we hope you will enjoy.

The Arctic Wednesday: polar online presentations

The Arc­tic Wed­nes­day: polar online pre­sen­ta­ti­ons with Bir­git Lutz and Rolf Stan­ge.

The pre­sen­ta­ti­ons will be in Ger­man. I know the­re are a lot of Ger­man-spea­king visi­tors to the Eng­lish site, for exam­p­le from the Net­her­lands – this is why I include this brief note here in Eng­lish. For fur­ther infor­ma­ti­on, plea­se refer to the Ger­man ver­si­on of this page (chan­ge lan­guage by cli­cking on the flagg sym­bol on top of this page).

Click on thumb­nail to open an enlar­ged ver­si­on of the spe­ci­fic pho­to.

More crev­as­ses on Spitsbergen’s gla­ciers

First of all: hap­py new year!

Many of Spitsbergen’s gla­ciers have “always” had a lot of cre­va­ses, while others are con­side­red good traf­fic ways for tho­se moving around in the arc­tic wil­der­ness. This is – was? – the case espe­ci­al­ly for many of Spitsbergen’s smal­ler gla­ciers that ter­mi­na­te with a gent­le slo­pe on land, rather than with a cal­ving front at sea level. The smal­ler ones, ending on land, usual­ly move more slow­ly, which crea­tes less stress in the ice and hence fewer crev­as­ses.

More crev­as­ses on clas­si­cal “tou­ring gla­ciers”

This has appear­ent­ly chan­ged for at least a num­ber of gla­ciers, as the Sys­sel­man­nen estab­lished during a heli­c­op­ter inspec­tion of fre­quent­ly tra­vel­led gla­ciers in Nor­dens­ki­öld Land in Octo­ber 2020. It tur­ned out that some of the­se gla­ciers had signi­fi­cant­ly more crev­as­ses than they used to have in the past.

Glacier tour

Many of Spitsbergen’s gla­cier have been thought to have few crev­as­ses only, which made them com­pa­ra­tively easy tou­ring ter­rain …

Ano­ther fac­tor rele­vant for safe­ty on gla­ciers is snow, which can build up snow bridges over crev­as­ses. Such bridges are fine when they are strong and safe, but they can be very dan­ge­rous traps if they are too thin to be strong enough, but thick enough to hide the crev­as­se. The sum­mer of 2020 was at times extre­me­ly warm and has mel­ted a lot of snow also on the hig­her parts of the gla­ciers. Snow bridges have build up again from zero.

Safe­ty and respon­si­bi­li­ty

Ever­y­bo­dy who is out in the field in arc­tic ter­rain, be it with snow mobi­le, hiking, ski­ing, dog sledge, … should be careful and take ade­qua­te safe­ty mea­su­res, espe­ci­al­ly in gla­cia­ted ter­rain. That has always been true and now this seems to be more rele­vant than befo­re at least on some of Spitsbergen’s fre­quent­ly tra­vel­led gla­ciers, and most likely also on other ones. In the press release, the Sys­sel­man­nen made it very clear that anyo­ne who is on tour is him-/hers­elf respon­si­ble for his/her own safe­ty. Just in case anyo­ne nee­ded a remin­der.

Crevasses

… but this has chan­ged for at least some of them. Crev­as­ses like the ones seen here are life dan­ge­rous, espe­ci­al­ly when they are hid­den under snow.

The Sys­sel­man­nen has published a pdf with pho­tos and maps that show some of the gla­ciers and crev­as­se fields in ques­ti­on.

The reasons are not yet sci­en­ti­fi­cal­ly estab­lished. It would be natu­ral to assu­me that the velo­ci­ty of shrin­king gla­ciers is decre­asing rather than the oppo­si­te. For a bit of spe­cu­la­ti­on, it may appear reasonable to think that the extra melt­wa­ter sup­p­ly during the warm sum­mer of 2020 has decreased the inter­nal fric­tion of the gla­ciers, which may lead to grea­ter speed and thus grea­ter mecha­ni­cal stress, hence more crev­as­ses.

Back

News-Listing live generated at 2023/January/29 at 13:25:12 Uhr (GMT+1)
css.php